On this page:
1.1.1 Images
image?
image=?
1.1.2 Modes and Colors
color
image-color?
1.1.3 Creating Basic Shapes
rectangle
circle
ellipse
triangle
star
regular-polygon
line
text
1.1.4 Basic Image Properties
image-width
image-height
pinhole-x
pinhole-y
put-pinhole
move-pinhole
1.1.5 Composing Images
add-line
overlay
overlay/  xy
image-inside?
find-image
1.1.6 Manipulating Images
shrink-tl
shrink-tr
shrink-bl
shrink-br
shrink
1.1.7 Scenes
scene?
empty-scene
place-image
nw:  rectangle
scene+  line
1.1.8 Miscellaneous Image Manipulation and Creation
List-of-color
image->color-list
color-list->image
alpha-color
image->alpha-color-list
alpha-color-list->image

1.1 Manipulating Images: "image.rkt" 🔗

 (require htdp/image) package: htdp-lib

NOTE: This library is deprecated; use 2htdp/image, instead. For the foreseeable time, we will continue to support the teachpack for your existing programs.

The teachpack provides functions for constructing and manipulating images. Basic, colored images are created as outlines or solid shapes. Additional functions allow for the composition of images.

1.1.1 Images 🔗

procedure

(image? x)  boolean?

  x : any/c
Is x an image?

procedure

(image=? x y)  boolean?

  x : image?
  y : image?
Are x and y the same image?

1.1.2 Modes and Colors 🔗

Mode (one-of/c 'solid 'outline "solid" "outline")

A Mode is used to specify whether painting a shape fills or outlines the form.

struct

(struct color (red green blue)
    #:extra-constructor-name make-color)
  red : (and/c natural-number/c (<=/c 255))
  green : (and/c natural-number/c (<=/c 255))
  blue : (and/c natural-number/c (<=/c 255))

RGB color?

A RGB describes a color via a shade of red, blue, and green colors (e.g., (make-color 100 200 30)).

Color (or/c symbol? string? color?)

A Color is a color-symbol (e.g., 'blue) or a color-string (e.g., "blue") or an RGB structure.

procedure

(image-color? x)  boolean?

  x : any
Determines if the input is a valid image Color.

1.1.3 Creating Basic Shapes 🔗

In DrRacket, you can insert images from your file system. Use PNG images whenever possible. In addition, you can create basic shapes with the following functions.

procedure

(rectangle w h m c)  image?

  w : (and/c number? (or/c zero? positive?))
  h : (and/c number? (or/c zero? positive?))
  m : Mode
  c : Color
Creates a w by h rectangle, filled in according to m and painted in color c

procedure

(circle r m c)  image?

  r : (and/c number? (or/c zero? positive?))
  m : Mode
  c : Color
Creates a circle or disk of radius r, filled in according to m and painted in color c

procedure

(ellipse w h m c)  image?

  w : (and/c number? (or/c zero? positive?))
  h : (and/c number? (or/c zero? positive?))
  m : Mode
  c : Color
Creates a w by h ellipse, filled in according to m and painted in color c

procedure

(triangle s m c)  image?

  s : number?
  m : Mode
  c : Color
Creates an upward pointing equilateral triangle whose side is s pixels long, filled in according to m and painted in color c

procedure

(star n outer inner m c)  image?

  n : (and/c number? (>=/c 2))
  outer : (and/c number? (>=/c 1))
  inner : (and/c number? (>=/c 1))
  m : Mode
  c : Color
Creates a multi-pointed star with n points, an outer radius for the max distance of the points to the center, and an inner radius for the min distance to the center.

procedure

(regular-polygon s r m c [angle])  image?

  s : side
  r : number?
  m : Mode
  c : Color
  angle : real? = 0
Creates a regular polygon with s sides inscribed in a circle of radius r, using mode m and color c. If an angle is specified, the polygon is rotated by that angle.

procedure

(line x y c)  image?

  x : number?
  y : number?
  c : Color
Creates a line colored c from (0,0) to (x ,y). See add-line below.

procedure

(text s f c)  Image

  s : string?
  f : (and/c number? positive?)
  c : Color
Creates an image of the text s at point size f and painted in color c.

1.1.4 Basic Image Properties 🔗

To understand how images are manipulated, you need to understand the basic properties of images.

procedure

(image-width i)  integer?

  i : image?
Obtain i’s width in pixels

procedure

(image-height i)  integer?

  i : image?
Obtain i’s height in pixels

For the composition of images, you must know about pinholes. Every image come with a pinhole. For images created with the above functions, the pinhole is at the center of the shape except for those created from line and text. The text function puts the pinhole at the upper left corner of the image, and line puts the pinhole at the beginning of the line (meaning that if the first two arguments to line are positive, the pinhole is also in the upper left corner). The pinhole can be moved, of course, and compositions locate pinholes according to their own rules. When in doubt you can always find out where the pinhole is and place it where convenient.

procedure

(pinhole-x i)  integer?

  i : image?
Determines the x coordinate of the pinhole, measuring from the left of the image.

procedure

(pinhole-y i)  integer?

  i : image?
Determines the y coordinate of the pinhole, measuring from the top (down) of the image.

procedure

(put-pinhole i x y)  image?

  i : image?
  x : number?
  y : number?
Creates a new image with the pinhole in the location specified by x and y, counting from the left and top (down), respectively.

procedure

(move-pinhole i delta-x delta-y)  image?

  i : image?
  delta-x : number?
  delta-y : number?
Creates a new image with the pinhole moved down and right by delta-x and delta-y with respect to its current location. Use negative numbers to move it up or left.

1.1.5 Composing Images 🔗

Images can be composed, and images can be found within compositions.

procedure

(add-line i x1 y1 x2 y2 c)  image?

  i : image?
  x1 : number?
  y1 : number?
  x2 : number?
  y2 : number?
  c : Color
Creates an image by adding a line (colored c) from (x1,y1) to (x2,y2) to image i.

procedure

(overlay img img2 img* ...)  image?

  img : image?
  img2 : image?
  img* : image?
Creates an image by overlaying all images on their pinholes. The pinhole of the resulting image is the same place as the pinhole in the first image.

procedure

(overlay/xy img delta-x delta-y other)  image?

  img : image?
  delta-x : number?
  delta-y : number?
  other : image?
Creates an image by adding the pixels of other to img.

Instead of lining the two images up on their pinholes, other’s pinhole is lined up on the point:
(make-posn (+ (pinhole-x img) delta-x)
           (+ (pinhole-y img) delta-y))

The pinhole of the resulting image is the same place as the pinhole in the first image.

The same effect can be had by combining move-pinhole and overlay,
(overlay img
         (move-pinhole other
                       (- delta-x)
                       (- delta-y)))

procedure

(image-inside? img other)  boolean?

  img : image?
  other : image?
Determines whether the pixels of the second image appear in the first.

Be careful when using this function with jpeg images. If you use an image-editing program to crop a jpeg image and then save it, image-inside? does not recognize the cropped image, due to standard compression applied to JPEG images.

procedure

(find-image img other)  posn?

  img : image?
  other : image?
Determines where the pixels of the second image appear in the first, with respect to the pinhole of the first image. If (image-inside? img other) isn’t true, find-image signals an error.

1.1.6 Manipulating Images 🔗

Images can also be shrunk. These “shrink” functions trim an image by eliminating extraneous pixels.

procedure

(shrink-tl img width height)  image?

  img : image?
  width : number?
  height : number?
Shrinks the image to a width by height image, starting from the top-left corner. The pinhole of the resulting image is in the center of the image.

procedure

(shrink-tr img width height)  image?

  img : image?
  width : number?
  height : number?
Shrinks the image to a width by height image, starting from the top-right corner. The pinhole of the resulting image is in the center of the image.

procedure

(shrink-bl img width height)  image?

  img : image?
  width : number?
  height : number?
Shrinks the image to a width by height image, starting from the bottom-left corner. The pinhole of the resulting image is in the center of the image.

procedure

(shrink-br img width height)  image?

  img : image?
  width : number?
  height : number?
Shrinks the image to a width by height image, starting from the bottom-right corner. The pinhole of the resulting image is in the center of the image.

procedure

(shrink img left above right below)  image?

  img : image?
  left : number?
  above : number?
  right : number?
  below : number?
Shrinks an image around its pinhole. The numbers are the pixels to save to left, above, to the right, and below the pinhole, respectively. The pixel directly on the pinhole is always saved.

1.1.7 Scenes 🔗

A scene is an image, but with the pinhole in the upper-left corner, i.e. an image where pinhole-x and pinhole-y both return 0.

Scenes are particularly useful with the 2htdp/universe and htdp/world teachpacks, since it displays only scenes in its canvas.

procedure

(scene? x)  boolean?

  x : any/c
Is x an scene?

procedure

(empty-scene width height)  scene?

  width : natural-number/c
  height : natural-number/c
creates a plain white, width x height scene.

procedure

(place-image img x y s)  scene?

  img : image?
  x : number?
  y : number?
  s : scene?
creates a scene by placing img at (x, y) into s; (x, y) are computer graphics coordinates, i.e., they count right and down from the upper-left corner.

procedure

(nw:rectangle width    
  height    
  solid-or-outline    
  c)  image?
  width : natural-number/c
  height : natural-number/c
  solid-or-outline : Mode
  c : Color
creates a width by height rectangle, solid or outlined as specified by solid-or-outline and colored according to c, with a pinhole at the upper left corner.

procedure

(scene+line s x0 y0 x1 y1 c)  scene?

  s : scene?
  x0 : number?
  y0 : number?
  x1 : number?
  y1 : number?
  c : Color
creates a scene by placing a line of color c from (x0, y0) to (x1, y1) using computer graphics coordinates. In contrast to the add-line function, scene+line cuts off those portions of the line that go beyond the boundaries of the given s.

1.1.8 Miscellaneous Image Manipulation and Creation 🔗

The last group of functions extracts the constituent colors from an image and converts a list of colors into an image.

value

List-of-color : list?

is one of:
;  empty
;  (cons Color List-of-color)
; Interpretation: represents a list of colors.

procedure

(image->color-list img)  List-of-color

  img : image?
Converts an image to a list of colors.

procedure

(color-list->image l width height x y)  image?

  l : List-of-color
  width : natural-number/c
  height : natural-number/c
  x : natural-number/c
  y : natural-number/c
Converts a list of colors l to an image with the given width and height and pinhole (x,y) coordinates, specified with respect to the top-left of the image.

The remaining functions provide alpha-channel information as well. Alpha channels are a measure of transparency; 0 indicates fully opaque and 255 indicates fully transparent.

struct

(struct alpha-color (alpha red green blue)
    #:extra-constructor-name make-alpha-color)
  alpha : (and/c natural-number/c (<=/c 255))
  red : (and/c natural-number/c (<=/c 255))
  green : (and/c natural-number/c (<=/c 255))
  blue : (and/c natural-number/c (<=/c 255))
A structure representing an alpha color.

procedure

(image->alpha-color-list img)  (list-of alpha-color?)

  img : image?
to convert an image to a list of alpha colors

procedure

(alpha-color-list->image l width height x y)  image?

  l : (list-of alpha-color?)
  width : integer?
  height : integer?
  x : integer?
  y : integer?
Converts a list of alpha-colors l to an image with the given width and height and pinhole (x,y) coordinates, specified with respect to the top-left of the image.